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20130318
20130326
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)
: the chicago board of education is expected to vote on the measure in may. declining enrollment has also forced other major cities like washington d.c. and philadelphia to close scores of public schools in recent years. we take up the debate now with two people at the center of the fight. we start with jesse ruiz. he's vice president of the chicago board of education. he was appointed to that post by mayor rahm emanuel in 2011. i spoke with him a short time ago. welcome to you, so why is such a dramatic action so necessary? is this resources, money, pure and simple? >> no. it is two-fold. one, we are looking at a record budget deficit of about $1 billion next year. so we're looking for every aspect to reap savings in our system. and we have underutilized schools as a result from it population loss in certain parts of the city of chicago. it's healthy for those schools to right size, to become fully utilizeed schools and combining under-utilizeed schools which garners savings we can reinvest and focus the resources we have in one school billion as opposed to multiple, partially used billions. >>
education, because i feel that if we educate ourselves, the more we educate ourselves, that we can overcome poverty. and the fact that if we do it as a community, and we stick together, we bond together, we support one another, with education, with health, then we can start to fix some of the issues at the root of the cause. and so we can erase, we can erase families who are struggling to get by on minimum wage. we can erase the drug abuse that we see on the streets and in the home. we can erase the gun violence and the domestic violence, and we can start to bring attention to mental illness. but this can only be done if everyone in the community is invested. so i think it has to be a position that we all take in which we say, yeah, take better care of yourself, yeah, go for your prescreening to make sure that you don't have any ailment that can be detrimental to you down the road. we also can then turn to our youth and our adults and say, "it's okay to get educated on these matters, it's okay to do well in school, for the young person that's in school. it's okay to achieve and be academica
. >> solman: a blogger for the chronicle of higher education, potter has argued that older scholars are clogging the pipeline for the younger ones. the number of ph.d's now far outstrips the number of tenured job openings. >> there's a lot of rage out there about being trained for jobs that you can never have. is it worth keeping younger people out, not giving them the chance to have full-time work, to develop themselves, so that older people can hang on to keep everything we love? >> solman: and these days, even younger people aren't always spring chickens. it's been seven years since 38- year-old joe fruscione earned his ph.d in english from george washington university. he has yet to land a full-time job. >> the market for ph.d's in humanities is almost super- saturated. there have been some positions where i've had to compete with hundreds of applicants who all on paper have roughly the same education and skill sets. >> so fruscione works three part-time gigs. one is running a moby dick discussion group at a washington, d.c. bookstore. >> when you hear moby dick, you think... >>
shortage in ireland. he wants more emphasis on science and mathematics education for irish kids, and an open door to bright young people like chugh from everywhere. >> we're looking at short-term, medium-term, long-term. we're going to change how we change work permits for non- irish national, so that will help bring in a lot more skilled computer science people into the irish economy. that will help bring in a lot more qualified, skilled computer science into the irish economy. >> suarez: but to have a healthy domestic economy, ireland can't just create great jobs for manipulating data on microchips. there's a role for potato chips too. this family has been growing potatoes for generations. irish potato consumption waned during the economic boom as irish tastes changed. the youngest generation of this family look for new markets and started a new business. gourmet potato chips called crisps here, kettled in small batches. after 18 months, they're selling in europe, asia, and to high-end american grocers. food was noted again and again by the experts as an export sector where ir
demographics but i wonder whether there's a geographic part of this and an educational part of this which would drive people's opinions. have you been able to see that? >> i definitely have. currently there are about 12 states where there is a majority support for same-sex marriage and all of them have got some sort of legal recognition for same-sex couples. on the other hand, in the deep south support is still probably mid-30s whereas it's probably 60% or more in massachusetts and much of the northeast. like wise, beam college degrees or bachelors degrees are markedly more likely to support same-sex marriage than are people who didn't complete high school or have no college. >> ifill: michael dimock, are the people ahead of the politicianstor politicians ahead of the people on this? >> you could argue it either way. barack obama announced his support for gay marriage after the lines had crossed in the public level. after a majority of americans tipped in that direction. i think when you look at the republican party and what this segment talked about, the changes in the republican party and peo
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)